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Netint technologies

From Cloud to Local Transcoding For Minimum Latency and Maximum Quality

Jan Ozer

Jan Ozer

is Senior Director of Video Marketing at NETINT.

Jan is also a contributing editor to Streaming Media Magazine , writing about codecs and encoding tools. He has written multiple authoritative books on video encoding, including ‘Video Encoding by the Numbers: Eliminate the Guesswork from your Streaming Video’ and ‘ Learn to Produce Video with FFmpeg: In Thirty Minutes or Less’ and has produced multiple training courses relating to streaming media production.

Over the last ten years or so, most live productions have migrated towards a workflow that sends a contribution stream from the venue into the cloud for transcoding and delivery. For live events that need absolute minimum latency and maximum quality, it may be time to rethink that workflow, particularly if you’ve got multiple sharable inputs at the venue.

So says Bart Snoeks, Account & Partnership Director of THEO Technologies (“THEO”). By way of background, THEO invented and has commercially implemented the High-Efficiency Streaming Protocol (HESP), an adaptive HTTP- based video streaming protocol that enables sub-second end-to-end latency. You see how HESP compares to other low latency protocols in the table shown in Figure 1 from the HESP Alliance website – the organization focused on promoting and further advancing HESP.

Figure 1. HESP compared to other low latency protocols.

THEO has productized HESP as a real-time streaming service called THEOlive, which targets applications like live sports and betting, casino igaming, live auctions, and other events that require high-quality video at exceptionally low latency with delivery at scale. For example, in the case of in-play betting, cutting latency from 8 to 10 seconds (HLS) to under one second expands the betting window during the critical period just before the event.

When streaming casino games, ultra-low latency promotes fluent interactions between the players and ensures that all players see the turn of the cards in real time. When latency is lower, players can bet more quickly, increasing the number of hands that can be played.

According to Snoeks, a live streaming workflow that sends a contribution stream to the cloud for transcoding will always increase latency and can degrade quality as re-transcoding is needed. It’s especially poorly suited for stadium venues with multiple camera locations that want to enhance the attendee experience with multiple live feeds. In those latency-critical use cases you are actually adding network latency with a roundtrip to and from the cloud. Instead, it makes much more sense creating your encoding ladder and packaging on-site and pulling that directly from the origin to a private CDN for delivery.

Let’s take a step back and examine these two workflows.

Live Streaming Workflows

As stated at the top, most live-streaming productions encode a single contribution stream on-site and send that into the cloud for transcoding to a full ladder, packaging, and delivery. You see this workflow in Figure 2.

Figure 2. Encoding a contribution stream on-site to deliver to the cloud for transcoding, packaging, and delivery

This schema has multiple advantages. First, you’re sending a single stream to the cloud, lowering bandwidth requirements. Second, you’re centralizing your transcoding assets in a single location in the cloud, which typically enables better utilization.

According to Snoeks, however, this workflow will add 200 to 500  milliseconds of latency at a minimum, depending on the encoding speed, quality, and contribution protocol. In addition, though high-quality contribution encoders can minimize generational loss from the contribution stream, lower-quality transcoders can noticeably degrade the quality of the final output. You also need a contribution encoder for each camera, which can jack up hardware costs in high-volume igaming and similar applications.

Instead, for some specific use cases, you should consider the workflow shown in Figure 3. Here, you transcode on-site and send the full encoding ladder to a public CDN for external delivery and to a private CDN or equivalent for local viewing. This decreases latency to a minimum and produces absolute top quality as you avoid the additional transcoding step.

From Cloud to Local Transcoding - Figure-2
Figure 3. Encoding and packaging the encoding ladder on site and transmitting the streams to a public CDN for external viewers and a private CDN for local viewers.

This schema is particularly useful for venues that want to enhance the in-stadium experience with multiple camera feeds. Imagine a stock car race where an attendee only sees his driver on the track once every minute or so. Encoding on-site might allow attendees to watch the camera view from inside their favorite driver’s car with near real-time latency. It might let golf fans follow multiple groups while parked at a hole or following their favorite player.

If you’re encoding input from many cameras, say in a casino or even racetrack environment, the cost of on-site encoding might be less than the cost of the individual contribution encoders. So, you get the best of all worlds, lower cost per stream, lower latency, higher quality, and a better in-person experience where applicable.

If you’re interested in learning about your transcoding options, check out our symposium Building Your Own Live Streaming Cloud, where you can hear from multiple technology experts discussing transcoding options like CPU-only, GPU, and ASIC-based transcoding and their respective costs, throughput, and density.

If you’re interested in learning more about HESP, THEO in general, or THEOlive, watch for an upcoming episode of Voices of Video, where I interview Pieter-Jan Speelman, CTO of THEO Technologies. We’ll discuss HESP’s history and evolution, the power of THEOlive real-time streaming technology, and how to use it in your live production stack. Make sure you don’t miss it!

Now ON-DEMAND: Symposium on Building Your Live Streaming Cloud

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