fbpx
Netint technologies

NETINT Video Transcoding Server Review

Jan Ozer

Jan Ozer

is Senior Director of Video Marketing at NETINT.

Jan is also a contributing editor to Streaming Media Magazine , writing about codecs and encoding tools. He has written multiple authoritative books on video encoding, including ‘Video Encoding by the Numbers: Eliminate the Guesswork from your Streaming Video’ and ‘ Learn to Produce Video with FFmpeg: In Thirty Minutes or Less’ and has produced multiple training courses relating to streaming media production.

Many high-volume streaming platforms and services still deploy software-only transcoding, but high energy prices for private data centers and escalating public cloud costs make the OPEX, carbon footprint, and dismal scalability unsustainable. Engineers looking for solutions to this challenge are actively exploring hardware that can integrate with their existing workflows and deliver the quality and flexibility of software with the performance and operational cost efficiency of purpose-built hardware. 

If this sounds like you, the USD $8,900 NETINT Video Transcoding Server could be the ideal solution. The server combines the Supermicro 1114S-WN10RT AMD EPYC 7543P-powered 1RU server with ten NETINT T408 video transcoders that draw just 7 watts each. Encoding HEVC and H.264 at normal or low latency, you can control transcoding operations via  FFmpeg, GStreamer, or a low-level API. This makes the server a drop-in replacement for a traditional x264 or x265 FFmpeg-based or GPU-powered encoding stack.

NETINT Video Transcoding Server

Due to the performance advantage of ASICs compared to software running on x86 CPUs, the server can perform the equivalent work of roughly 10 separate machines running a typical open-source FFmpeg and x264 or x265 configuration. Specifically,  the server can simultaneously transcode twenty 4Kp30 streams, and up to 80 1080p30 live streams. In ABR mode, the server transcodes up to 30 five-rung H.264 encoding ladders from 1080p to 360p resolution, and up to 28 four-rung HEVC encoding ladders. For engineers delivering UHD, the server can output seven 6-rung HEVC encoding ladders from 4K to 360p resolution, all while drawing less than 325 watts of total power.

This review begins with a technical description of the server and transcoding hardware and the options available to drive the encoders, including the resource manager that distributes jobs among the ten transcoders. Then we’ll review performance results for one-to-one streaming and then H.264 and HEVC ladder generation, and finish with a look at the server’s ultra-efficient power consumption.

NETINT Transcoding Server with 10 T408 Video Transcoders

Hardware Specs

Built on the Supermicro 1114S-WN10RT 1RU server platform, the NETINT Video Transcoding Server features ten NETINT Codensity ASIC-powered T408 video transcoders, and runs Ubuntu 20.04.05 LTSThe server ships with 128 GB of DDR4-3200 RAM and a 400GB M.2 SSD drive with 3x PCIe slots and ten NVME slots to house the ten U.2 T408 video transcoders.

You can buy the server with any of three AMD EPYC processors with 8 to 64 cores. We performed the tests for this review on the 32-core AMD EPYC 7543P CPU that doubles to 64 threads with multithreading.  The server configured with the AMD EPYC 7713P processor with 64-cores and 128-threads sells for USD $11,500, and the economical AMD EPYC 7232P processor-based server with 8-cores and 16-threads lists for USD $7,000.

Regarding the server hardware, Supermicro is a leading server and storage vendor that designs, develops, and manufactures primarily in the United States. Supermicro adheres to high-quality standards, with a quality management system certified to the ISO 9001:2015 and ISO 13485:2016 standards and an environmental management system certified to the ISO 14001:2015 standard. Supermicro is also a leader in green computing and reducing data center footprints (see the white paper Green Computing: Top Ten Best Practices for a Green Data Center). As you’ll see below, this focus has resulted in an extremely power-efficient machine when operated with NETINT video transcoders.

Let’s explore the system - NETINT Video Transcoding Server

With this as background, let’s explore the system. Once up and running in Ubuntu, you can check T408 status via the ni_rsrc_mon_logan command, which reveals the number of T408s installed and their status. Looking at Figure 1, the top table shows the decoder performance of the installed T408s, while the bottom table shows the encoding performance.

NETINT Video Transcoding Server - Tracking the operation of the T408s, decode on top, encode on the bottom.
Figure 1. Tracking the operation of the T408s, decode on top, encode on the bottom.

About the T408

T408s have been in service since 2019 and are being used extensively in hyper-scale platforms and cloud gaming applications. To date, more than 200 billion viewer minutes of live video have been encoded using the T408. This makes it one of the bestselling ASIC-based encoders on the market.

The NETINT T408 is powered by the Codensity G4 ASIC technology and is available in both PCIe and U.2 form factors. The T408s installed in the server are the U.2 form factor plugged into ten NVMe bays. The T408 supports close caption passthrough, and EIA CEA-708 encode/decode, along with support for High Dynamic Range in HDR10 and HDR10+ formats.

“To date, more than 200 billion viewer minutes of live video have been encoded using the T408. This makes it one of the bestselling ASIC-based encoders on the market.” 

ALEX LIU, Co-Founder,
COO at NETINT Technologies Inc.

The T408 decodes and encodes H.264 and HEVC on board but performs all scaling and overlay operations via the host CPU. For one-to-one same-resolution transcoding, users can select an option called YUV Bypass that sends the video transcoded by the T408 directly to the T408 encoder. This eliminates high-bandwidth trips through the bus to and from system memory, reducing the load on the bus and CPU. As you’ll see, in pure 1:1 transcode applications without overlay, CPU utilization is very low, so the T408 and server are very efficient for cloud gaming and other same-resolution, low-latency interactive applications. 

NETINT Codensity, ASIC-based T408 Video Transcoder
Figure 2. The T408 is powered by the Codensity G4 ASIC.

Testing Overview

We tested the server with FFmpeg and GStreamer. As you’ll see, in most operations, performance was similar. In some simple transcoding applications, FFmpeg pulled ahead, while in more complex encoding ladder productions, particularly 4K encoding, GStreamer proved more performant, particularly for low-latency output.

NETINT Video Transcoding Server - Codensity Video Transcoder-FFmpeg and GStreamer.
Figure 3. The software architecture for controlling the server.  

Operationally, both GStreamer and FFmpeg communicate with the libavcodec layer that functions between the T408 NVME interface and the FFmpeg software layer. This allows existing FFmpeg and GStreamer-based transcoding applications to control server operation with minimal changes.

To allocate jobs to the ten T408s, the T408 device driver software includes a resource management module that tracks T408 capacity and usage load to present inventory and status on available resources and enable resource distribution. There are several modes of operation, including auto, which automatically distributes the work among the available resources.

Alternatively, you can manually assign decoding and encoding tasks to different T408 devices in the command line or application and control which streams are decoded by the host CPU or a T408. With these and similar controls, you can efficiently balance the overall transcoding load between the T408s and host CPU to maximize throughput. We used auto distribution for all tests.

Testing Procedures

We tested using Server version 1.0, running FFmpeg v4.3.1 and GStreamer v1.18 and T408 release 3.2.0. We tested with two use cases in mind. The first is a stream in-single stream out, either at the same resolution as the incoming stream or output at a lower resolution.  This mode of operation is used in many interactive applications like cloud gaming, real-time gaming, and auctions where the absolute lowest latency is required. We also tested scaling performance since many interactive applications scale the input to a lower resolution.

The second use case is ABR, where a single input stream is transcoded to a full encoding ladder. In both modes, we tested normal and low-latency performance. To simulate live streaming and minimize file I/O as a drag on system performance, we retrieved the source file from a RAM drive on the server and delivered the encoded file to RAM.

Play Video about Hard Questions on Hot Topics - Supermicro - NETINT Transcoding Server Review - Jan Ozer and Anita Flejter
HARD QUESTIONS ON HOT TOPICS
All you need to know about NETINT Transcoding Server powered by ASICs
Watch the full conversation on YouTube: https://youtu.be/6j-dbPbmejw

One-to-One Performance

Table 1 shows transcoding results for 4K, 1080p, and 720p in latency tolerant and low-delay modes. Instances is the number of full frame rate outputs produced by the system, with CPU utilization shown for reference. These results are most relevant for cloud gaming and similar applications that input a single stream, transcode the stream at full resolution, and distribute it.

As you can see, 4K results peak at 20 streams for all codecs, though results differ by the software program used to generate the streams. The number of 1080p outputs range from 70 – 80, while 720p streams range from 140 to 170. As you would expect, CPU utilization is extremely low for all test cases as the T408s are shouldering the complete decoding/encoding role. This means that performance is limited by T408 throughput, not CPU, and that the 64-core CPU probably wouldn’t produce any extra streams in this use case. For pure encoding operations, the 8-core server would likely suffice, though given the minimal price differential between the 8-core and 32-core systems, opting for the higher-end model is a prudent investment.

Latency

As for latency, in the normal mode, latency averaged around 45 ms for 4K transcoding and 34 ms for 1080p and 720p transcoding. In low delay mode, this dropped to around 24 ms for 4K, 7 ms for 1080p, and 3 ms for 720, all at 30 fps transcoding and measured with FFmpeg. For reference, at 30 fps, each frame is displayed for 33.33 ms. Even in latency-tolerant mode, latency is just over 1.36 frames for 4K and under a single frame for 1080p and 720p. In low delay modes, all resolutions are under a single frame of latency.

It’s worth noting that while software performance would drop significantly from H.264 to HEVC, hardware performance does not. Thus questions of codec performance for more advanced standards like HEVC do not apply when using ASICs. This is good news for engineers adopting HEVC, and those considering HEVC in the future. It means you can buy the server, comfortable in the knowledge that it will perform equally well (if not better) for HEVC encoding or transcoding.

NETINT Video Transcoding Server - table 1
Table 1. Full resolution transcodes with FFmpeg and Gstreamer
in regular and low delay modes.

Table 2 shows the performance when scaling from 4K to 1080p and from 1080p to 720p, again by the different codecs in and out. Since scaling is performed by the host CPU, CPU usage increases significantly, particularly on the higher volume 1080p to 720p output. Still, given that CPU utilization never exceeds 35%, it appears that the gating factor to system performance is T408 throughput. Again, while the 8-core system might be able to produce similar output if your application involves scaling, the 32-core system is probably better advised.

In these tests, latency was slightly higher than pure transcoding. In normal mode, 4K > 1080p latencies topped out at 46 ms and dropped to 39 ms for 1080p > 720p scaling, just over a single frame of latency. In low latency mode, these results dropped to 10 ms for 4K > 1080p and 10 ms for 1080p > 720p. As before, these latency results are for 30fps and were measured with FFmpeg.

NETINT Video Transcoding Server - table 2
Table 2: Performance while scaling from 4K to 1080p and 1080p to 720p.

The final set of tests involves transcoding to the AVC and HEVC encoding ladders shown in Table 3. These results will be most relevant to engineers distributing full encoding ladders in HLS, DASH, or CMAF containers.

Here we see the most interesting discrepancies between FFmpeg and GStreamer, particularly in low delay modes and in 4K results. In the 1080p AVC tests, FFmpeg produced 30 5-rung encoding ladders in normal mode but dropped to nine in low-delay mode. GStreamer produced 30 encoding ladders in both modes using substantially lower CPU resources. You see the same pattern in the 1080p four-rung HEVC output where GStreamer produced more ladders than FFmpeg using lower CPU resources in both modes.

NETINT Video Transcoding Server - table 3
Table 3. Full encoding ladders output in the listed modes.

FFmpeg produced very poor results in 4K testing, particularly in low latency mode, and it was these results that drove the testing with GStreamer. As you can see, GStreamer produced more streams in both modes and CPU utilization again remained very low. As with the previous results, the low CPU utilization means that the results reflect the encoding limits of the T408. For this reason, it’s unlikely that the higher end server would produce more encoding ladders.

In terms of latency, in normal mode, latency was 59 ms for the H.264 ladder, 72 ms for the 4 rung 1080p HEVC ladder, and 52 ms for the 4K HEVC ladder. These numbers dropped to 5 ms, 7 ms, and 9 ms for the respective configurations in low latency mode.

Power Consumption

Power consumption is an obvious concern for all video engineers and operations teams. To assess system power consumption, we tested using the IPMI Tool. When running completely idle, the system consumed 154 watts, while at maximum CPU, the unit averaged 400 watts with a peak of 425 watts.

We measured consumption during the three basic operations tested, pure transcoding, transcoding with scaling, and ladder creation, in each case testing the GStreamer scenario that produced the highest recorded CPU usage. You see the results in Table 4.

When you consider that CPU-only transcoding would yield a fraction of the outputs shown while consuming 25-30% more power, you can see that the T408 is exceptionally efficient when it comes to power consumption. The Watts/Output figure provides a useful comparison for other competitive systems, whether CPU or GPU-based.

NETINT Video Transcoding Server - table 4
Table 4. Power consumption during the specified operation.

Conclusion

With impressive density, low power consumption, and multiple integration options, the NETINT Video Transcoding Server is the new standard to beat for live streaming applications. With a lower price model available for pure encoding operations, and a more powerful model for CPU-intensive operations, the NETINT server family meets a broad range of requirements.

Related Article

Capped CRF
NETINT Symposium

Save Bandwidth with Capped CRF

What You Can Do with a VPU: Save Bandwidth with Capped CRF   Video engineers are constantly seeking ways to deliver high-quality video more efficiently